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San Francisco’s Conservatory of Flowers Exhibit Features Goldman Prize Recipients

San Francisco’s Conservatory of Flowers Exhibit Features Goldman Prize Recipients

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Interim Executive Director of the Goldman Prize Lorrae Rominger recently had the opportunity to meet with Jane Scurich, Director of Administration and Development at San Francisco’s Conservatory of Flowers

For the last several years, the Conservatory has hosted a semi-permanent exhibit featuring the Goldman Prize recipients. Rominger and Scurich visited the display, which is currently featuring the 2013 Prize recipients.

Ms. Scurich commented on the exhibit, “We are honored to display the Goldman Environmental Prize winners in a treasured San Francisco living museum that Richard and Rhoda Goldman were so instrumental in saving for future generations. Our educational tours focus on environmental education and adaptations plants make to survive. We hope that our visitors leave with a deeper understanding of the importance of protecting our natural resources.”

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Erected in 1879, the Conservatory of Flowers is the oldest wood and glass conservatory in North America. It is a national historic landmark and beloved spot for locals and tourists alike.

The Conservatory has faced several challenges over the years, including fires, storm damage and economic hardships. The building was eventually forced to close in 1995.

Goldman Prize co-founder Rhoda Goldman had always been fond of the Conservatory and after she passed away, the Goldman Fund made a $5 million grant to the Conservatory in her memory.

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This grant served as a catalyst for an ambitious restoration campaign that ultimately grew to include funds from the National Trust for Historic Preservation and First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Millennium Council Project.

The Conservatory of Flowers officially reopened in 2003 and continues to serve as a thriving architectural and cultural treasure. 

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